Glenrock, WY

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From Lusk, we moved west to Glenrock, on the North Platte River, about 20 miles east of Casper, WY.  In Glenrock we parked at the Platte River Campground.

North Platte River

We checked out the Ayres Natural Bridge located a little east of Glenrock.  This rock bridge is 20 feet high with a span of 90 feet.  Since it is near the Oregon Trail, it is considered one of Wyoming’s first tourist attractions because it was often visited by emigrants traveling west.  In 1843, a pioneer described it as “a natural bridge of solid rock, over a rapid torrent, the arch being regular as tho’ shaped by art.”

On another day we headed west to Casper on the day they were holding a “5150 Festival”.  “5150” refers to the elevation of the city.  Apparently, they had quite a good party last year during the solar eclipse, being very much in the center of its path.  They were hoping for a repeat but in the absence of another eclipse they decided to go ahead with the festival anyway.

Next stop:  Wheatland, WY

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Back to Portland–June 2018

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When we were here back in early May, we knew we needed to nail down an RV spot in which to ride out the July 4th holiday period.  This is traditionally a very busy time for RV parks so you need to book early.  In addition, we needed to make arrangements to get to an event in Las Vegas scheduled for June 28 – July 1.  This event was the Iwashita-Akiyama family reunion.  This is a family group related to Valerie’s maternal grandmother.  Their first event was 3 years ago and they arranged to repeat it at the 3 year mark.  A good number of the group traveled from Hawaii for the event.

Iwashita-Akiyama family reunion

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Burnaby, British Columbia

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Burnaby is located on the east side of the city of Vancouver.  While here we stayed at the Burnaby Cariboo RV Park.  It is immediately adjacent to the Burnaby Lake Regional Park just off the Trans Canada Highway.  We visited the city of Vancouver on our car trip back in 2014.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

In North Vancouver you will find the Capilano Suspension Bridge.  This is a tourist attraction with the primary feature of a suspension bridge crossing the Capilano River.  The bridge is 460 feet in length and 230 feet above the riverbed.  The other features are Treetops Adventure which is a boardwalk and elevated footbridges among old growth forest and Cliffwalk which is a narrow walkway cantilevered from the cliff’s edge, extending out over the open canyon.  Don’t get me wrong, this is a beautiful place but it felt a little too staged for my tastes.  There are many places where you can get a comparable experience without the admission price which was about $69 USD for the two of us.  However for those who are unable or unwilling to do a little hiking, then this provides a convenient way to get the experience.

Sea to Sky Highway

On another day we did a day trip west to the end of the Trans Canada Highway at Horseshoe Bay.  From there Highway 99 turns north on what is known as the Sea to Sky Highway.  Immediately, you encounter jaw dropping beauty along the shore of the bay.  And it doesn’t stop as you continue north passing through Brittany Beach, Squamish and Whistler.  Along the way, a short walk gets you to Shannon Falls which at almost 1,100 feet is the third tallest waterfall in British Columbia.  The Whistler-Blackcomb ski resort was home to the 2010 Winter Olympics.  It is a large ski resort with extensive facilities and village development.

Next stop:  Arlington, WA

Hope, British Columbia

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From Anacortes, we headed north and crossed the Canadian border at Sumas, WA.  Once across, we turned east to the town of Hope.  This small town is on the Frasier River at the southern end of the Frasier Valley.  This is a place of spectacular natural beauty.  Near vertical granite mountains rise up in all directions.  The Trans Canada Highway runs through the valley.

In 1848, Fort Hope was established by Hudson’s Bay Company at the trailhead for what is now known as HBC Heritage Trail.  This trail was originally developed as a way to reach inland bypassing Frasier Valley since the valley walls were too steep to navigate.  In the years following, the fur trade and the 1858 Frasier River Gold Rush supported Hope and its residents.

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