Sheridan, WY

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From Billings, we headed southeast and crossed into Wyoming after having been in Montana since July 15th.  In Sheridan we parked at Peter D’s RV Park.

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument is located in Montana, just about halfway along the drive between Billings and Sheridan so we chose to make a day trip from Sheridan to visit there.  On June 25, 1876, approximately 260 of the 600 troops commanded by Gen. George Armstrong Custer were killed in a brief battle with a much larger force of Lakota-Cheyenne Indians commanded by Lakota Chief Sitting Bull.  Some 100 of the Indian fighters are thought to have died but it’s difficult to know since those who fell were removed from the battlefield.  The battle was bloody and brutal.  As you walk the grounds, read the placards and view the markers showing where soldiers died you can only try to imagine what it must have been like with arrows and gunfire raining down in all directions.  At the end of a very engaging Ranger talk about the battle, he said, “The ghosts here will speak to you.” Continue reading

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Charleston, SC

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To visit Charleston, we parked at Lake Aire RV Park in Hollywood, SC, about 12 miles southwest of Charleston.  While here we visited downtown Charleston, took a tour out to Fort Sumter and checked out Kiawah Island.

Charleston waterfront

Fort Sumter is on a small island strategically located in the Charleston Harbor.  It was originally one of a series of coastal fortifications built by the United States following the War of 1812.  It was still unfinished in late 1860 when South Carolina seceded from the United States as a statement about state sovereignty regarding slavery.  At this point a garrison of 85 federal troops led by Major Robert Anderson moved to Fort Sumter from nearby Fort Moultrie.  Within 4 months Confederate troops fired the first shots of the Civil War by attacking the Federal troops on Fort Sumter.  Three days later Major Anderson had to surrender Fort Sumter and was allowed to leave with all of his troops.  For the next 20 months Confederate troops held Fort Sumter against repeated assaults from Union cannons and gun ships.  Today it is Fort Sumter National Monument.

While in Charleston, we began to realize we would need to change our travel plans due to Hurricane Matthew.  We had planned to go to Savannah, GA, next but that would put us too close to the coast and too exposed to potential harm from the hurricane.  We postponed our Savannah plans and instead reserved a spot in Statesboro, GA, approximately 55 miles inland from Savannah.  Even 3 days ahead of the storm we had trouble finding an available RV spot.

Next stop:  Statesboro, GA