Bluff, UT

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From Monticello, we moved a little further south to Bluff, UT.  There we parked at the Coral Sands RV Park.

Natural Bridges National Monument Continue reading

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Monticello, UT

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Back in 2015, we traveled through Utah, visiting all five national parks in the state.  One of our stops was Moab.  From there we had the chance to see Arches National Park and Canyonlands National Park.

Canyonlands National Park

Canyonlands is a large park, specifically, 337,598 acres.  It consists of 3 districts.  The Island in the Sky district is closest to Moab and the most visited.  This is the part we saw back in 2015.  The Needles district occupies the southeastern part of the park and is close to Monticello.  This is the portion we visited on this trip.  The Maze district in the southwestern part of the park is very remote and is only accessible by 4 wheel drive vehicles and for backcountry exploration. Continue reading

Cortez, CO

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Our main objective for stopping in Cortez was to visit nearby Mesa Verde National Park.  In Cortez, we parked at La Mesa RV Park.

Mesa Verde - Cliff Palace

At around 500 A.D., groups of Native Americans living in the four corners region began moving onto Mesa Verde.  The four corners area consists of southwestern Colorado, northwestern New Mexico, northeastern Arizona and southeastern Utah.  These groups had already developed farming skills and no longer needed to remain mobile in order to follow game migrations.  So they could “put down roots” so to speak and stay put in one place. Continue reading

Durango, CO

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San Juan Skyway

Heading south from Montrose, the most direct route to reach Durango is US Highway 550.  The road is a part of what is called the “San Juan Skyway”, as it travels through the San Juan Mountain range of southwestern Colorado.  In particular, the portion of this highway between Ouray and Silverton is known as the “Million Dollar Highway”.  This road is hung on the face of the mountain and has narrow lanes, no shoulders, no guardrail and steep drops as you can see in the above photo.  A little dicey in a motorhome towing a car.  The origin of the name is in dispute.  Some of the possible explanations:  it cost one million dollars per mile to build; the fill dirt contains a million dollars in gold ore; or, I wouldn’t drive that road again for a million dollars.

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